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Chinedu Nwokeafor, an alumnus of Morgan State University, speaks during a rally in support of Maryland's four historically black colleges in Annapolis, Maryland, on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019.
Chinedu Nwokeafor, an alumnus of Morgan State University, speaks during a rally in support of Maryland's four historically black colleges in Annapolis, Maryland, on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. (Brian Witte/AP)

The suggestion for a third medical school in Baltimore made by Morgan State University is of great importance because of the millions of dollars involved and the effect on the medical care system (“Morgan State mulls new, privately run medical school,” Jan. 10). Maryland ranks second among the 50 states in the number of physicians per person. There is no need for another medical school that would increase the number of physicians.

As in every state, the availability of physicians in different locations is an issue, but research has found that additional physicians do not solve the problem. The Baltimore-Washington region has six medical schools, more than any other comparable region in the country. Baltimore has the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University; Washington has Howard University, Georgetown University and George Washington University; and Bethesda has a federal medical school for the uniformed services. These six medical schools provide all the medical resources that the region needs.

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A third medical school in Baltimore will cost many millions of dollars every year, graduate unneeded physicians and create many problems for the state’s medical care system.

William G. Rothstein, Pikesville

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