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Spending less on police doesn’t necessarily mean better resolutions to mental health crises | READER COMMENTARY

Crime scene tape crosses the 5800 block of Falkirk Road near the home where officers fired on a man who allegedly pulled a gun on them in the basement while responding to a behavioral crisis call.
Crime scene tape crosses the 5800 block of Falkirk Road near the home where officers fired on a man who allegedly pulled a gun on them in the basement while responding to a behavioral crisis call. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun)

Tavi Hawn, Doha Chibani and David Avruch assert in their commentary, “Mental health crises shouldn’t be handled by police” (July 7), that there might have been a different outcome in the tragic Baltimore Police Department shooting of a man experiencing a mental health crisis if a social worker would have responded. Considering the man was armed with not one, but two weapons, I wonder how long the hostages would have been held if a social worker had responded.

The truth is, we’ll never know. I agree that we ask too much of our police officers but this isn’t the evidentiary instance on which to make the case for defunding the police.

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Bob McGeehan, Columbia

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