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Traffic stop reveals why Thiru Vignarajah should not be mayor | READER COMMENTARY

Mayoral candidate Thiru Vignarajah, front, calls for action on aerial surveillance to help fight crime. In September, he was pulled over by city police on Greenmount Avenue in East Baltimore at around 1 a.m. during which he asked the officer to turn off his body camera.
Mayoral candidate Thiru Vignarajah, front, calls for action on aerial surveillance to help fight crime. In September, he was pulled over by city police on Greenmount Avenue in East Baltimore at around 1 a.m. during which he asked the officer to turn off his body camera.(Amy Davis)

Television news reports last week of Thiru Vignarajah’s traffic stop made it seem uneventful and newsworthy only because one of the higher profile candidates running to serve as Baltimore’s next mayor was pulled over. However, the recent investigative report in The Baltimore Sun provides much greater detail of what happened that evening and does not cast the best light on Mr. Vignarajah (“Vignarajah asked Baltimore police to turn off video during a late night encounter. Should they have complied?” Jan. 25).

From the implied privilege of position to request the officer to turn off his camera to the apparent disregard of the mandate the Maryland State Police gave him regarding the repair of his vehicle, this candid encounter could show us exactly what sort of mayor Mr. Vignarajah would be. Does Baltimore need yet another mayor who will pick and choose if laws, regulations and policies apply to him or her based on personal convenience?

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To paraphrase Maya Angelou, when someone shows you what kind of person they are, believe them.

Jeff Dening, Baltimore

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

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