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Civility in mayoral race? Not likely.

Surrounded by family and friends, City Council President Brandon Scott announces his bid to run to be Baltimore's next mayor.
Surrounded by family and friends, City Council President Brandon Scott announces his bid to run to be Baltimore's next mayor. (Lloyd Fox/The Baltimore Sun)

Oh, but to wish elections could be a wonderful sweet process where the candidates hugged each other and said good things about each other, (“Let’s choose civility in the Baltimore mayoral election," Sept. 20). But alas, during an election, politicians are more like piranha than civil people.

The problem is there is too much at stake to be nice to each other. Baltimore’s mayoral elections are held every four years so if you lose you have to wait another four years and by then your star may be dimmed if not out. Plus, you have four more years to screw up.

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If you look at the presidential election, you see the prime example of political non-civility and the mayoral election is but the little brother to the presidential election. But for the mayoral candidates, it might as well be the big one.

So while it is a nice gesture on the part of The Sun to try and foster a happy, friendly tone during the mayoral election, don’t hold your breath. For when the race gets really tough and close, the gloves of any civility will come off quick enough and the dirt will fly high and fast.

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Stas Chrzanowski, Baltimore

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