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Latest mass shootings seem to have quieted NRA | READER COMMENTARY

Rev. Paula Stecker of the Christ the King Lutheran Church stands in front of a memorial set up outside Club Q following last week's mass shooting at the gay nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2022.  (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)

Following the recent spate of mass shootings, President Joe Biden stated that he’ll push to renew a ban on semi-automatic assault-style rifles (“Biden again pledges to push for a ban on assault weapons,” Nov. 25). In July of this year, the U.S. House of Representatives on a party-line vote passed a ban on semi-automatic firearms, but the bill has never come to a vote in the politically deadlocked U.S. Senate.

After previous mass shootings, totaling 600 thus far in 2022, the National Rifle Association routinely offered meaningless condolences and repeated its hollow slogan that “guns don’t kill people, people kill people.” But the conversation seems to have changed. Thus far, after the recent mass shootings in Virginia and Colorado, there has not been the usual public statement from the NRA discounting the role of guns in the shootings.

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Although there is a split along polarized political lines, recent polls indicate that two-thirds of Americans support a ban on assault-style weapons. I may be overly optimistic, but perhaps the NRA is listening and, while still opposed to any further gun restrictions, is at least toning down its rhetoric.

— Beryl Rosenstein, Pikesville

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