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What is a mask compared to sacrifices of World War II? | READER COMMENTARY

U.S. Army veteran Lambert Wai, 99, sits next to a picture of his brother Francis Wai, the only soldier of Chinese ancestry to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, aboard the USS Missouri, during the official ceremony for the 75th anniversary of the Japanese surrender that ended World War II in Honolulu, on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020. (Craig T. Kojima/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP, Pool)
U.S. Army veteran Lambert Wai, 99, sits next to a picture of his brother Francis Wai, the only soldier of Chinese ancestry to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, aboard the USS Missouri, during the official ceremony for the 75th anniversary of the Japanese surrender that ended World War II in Honolulu, on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020. (Craig T. Kojima/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP, Pool) (Craig T. Kojima/AP)

In 1942, I was a student in my first semester in a Pennsylvania college. By chance, I saw an article in my hometown paper concerning another Pennsylvania college — then known as State Teachers College at Lock Haven — that was offering part- or full-time work as a defense worker while going to school. I enrolled at the college and went to work on a half-shift.

The day I arrived in Lock Haven I met some of the female students who asked me whether I wanted to go to the train station with them. “Why are you going?” I asked. “We are going in order to wave goodbye to the ‘Fighting Forty.’” All the men had enlisted together to fight in World War II.

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The college survived the war due to Sylvania Electric Products needing many people to work on its proximity fuze, a weapon that helped to shorten the war in the Pacific.

It makes wearing masks pretty simple, doesn’t it?

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Ruth Stahl, Towson

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