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Marylanders have played big roles in civil rights movement | READER COMMENTARY

Cynthia Erivo, left, with Aria Brooks, starred as Harriet Tubman in the movie "Harriet." The Underground Railroad conductor is just one of many prominent African Americans from Maryland who have shaped the nation's civil rights history.

Jacqueline Copeland’s commentary (“Black history month reminder: African American museums help preserve an often ignored history,” Feb. 2) is a timely reminder that African-Americans born in Maryland have played a significant role in the civil rights movement.

The Reginald F. Lewis Museum is in a unique position to highlight the contributions of Harriet Tubman, a leading abolitionist and political activist best known as a conductor of the Underground Railroad and Frederick Douglass, a national leader of the abolitionist movement who is considered one of the greatest orators in the history of the United States. There is also Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American Supreme Court Justice who is best known for arguing the Brown v. Board of Education case which led to desegregation of public schools in the United States, Clarence Mitchell, Jr., chief lobbyist of the NAACP and the late Congressman and civil rights champion Elijah Cummings.

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We are fortunate to have the Reginald F. Lewis Museum in Baltimore and as we enter Black History Month, what a great opportunity for the museum to showcase these outstanding Marylanders and their contributions to the national civil rights movement.

Beryl Rosenstein, Pikesville

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