xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Acela makes far more sense than maglev | READER COMMENTARY

First class seating, color-coded red, in the new Acela Express fleet, unveiled in a 2019 mockup by Amtrak for the Northeast Corridor service. Seating in first class and business class now have reading lights on the side of the headrests. Amtrak is replacing the current trains with 28 high-speed trainsets manufactured by Alstom. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun).
First class seating, color-coded red, in the new Acela Express fleet, unveiled in a 2019 mockup by Amtrak for the Northeast Corridor service. Seating in first class and business class now have reading lights on the side of the headrests. Amtrak is replacing the current trains with 28 high-speed trainsets manufactured by Alstom. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun). (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)

I very much respect The Baltimore Sun editorial board, but its commentary regarding Amtrak’s Acela and the proposed “multibillion-dollar” magnetic levitation train stresses wishful thinking and misunderstands rail patrons traveling between Washington and the large cities to our north (“Baltimore has a need for Amtrak - and maglev service, too,” May 7).

Overwhelmingly, those rail patrons are not businesspeople. Watch the boarding and exiting patrons at Penn Station — any day and every day — and you will see a very large majority of passengers traveling for fun, for family visits and for personal reasons having nothing to do with downtown businesses. These are mostly folks who live outside of the city, who might spend a few extra dollars for the Acela to save 50 minutes getting to New York, but they are very unlikely to part with a twice-the-price maglev ticket to save an additional 45 minutes en route. A survey of passengers, why they are traveling and where they live, would prove my view.

Advertisement

Only the improved Acela at Penn Station makes sense in terms of travel time, dollars and location. Rebuilding Baltimore’s economy via a maglev train at either of the inconveniently located proposed terminals fails the test of reality. There are far more effective ways to help restore Baltimore.

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement