xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Let's hear less from lobbyists and more from regular folks

Sights and sounds from the first day of the Maryland General Assembly. (Barbara Haddock Taylor, Baltimore Sun video)

Recently, there was an article urging lawmakers to avoid contact with bail-bond industry lobbyists (“After revelations in Oaks case, advocates urge lawmakers to avoid bail-bond industry lobbyists,” Jan. 10). Why not avoid all contact with lobbyists? I’ve often thought the lobbying of lawmakers put groups and causes without many resources at huge disadvantages because they cannot afford high-powered, highly-priced advocates.

It might be a boring suggestion, but maybe a way can be found to listen to anyone who is for or against an upcoming bill without any money, favors, or goods changing hands. Decide on a way for regular, everyday people to offer opinions, via mail or email. It seems to me that within the confines of a grueling three-month session, an hour or so each week could be set aside for reading opinions of the voters, as opposed to salaried “professionals.”

Advertisement

Pat Perkins, Pasadena

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement