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Legal immigrants are not afraid to go out

Daisy Galarza talks about how the potential deportation raids affect people she knows. (Kenneth K. Lam, Baltimore Sun video)

Earlier this year, I wrote a letter about “illegal immigrants” and listed the requirements for citizenship ("If immigrants became citizens they wouldn't have to be afraid of Census questions", Apr. 23).

I said at the time that “the real answer to this perceived problem is to help the immigrants become citizens of this country. First they have to be a lawfully admitted permanent resident and after five years of permanent legal residency they are eligible to apply for citizenship provided they meet other requirements. So let’s work to put them on the road to citizenship rather than to discriminate against them. It worked for our grandparents and it works for Baltimore.”

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The first line spells it out, “lawfully admitted permanent resident.” The first two words are the standard for being in this country. “Lawfully admitted” is the legal standard for the United States of America.

Now the problem is either we change the laws or deport those not “lawfully admitted.” Many of those considered “unlawfully admitted” were denied entrance by courts, ordered to report for deportation and then disappeared in the cities of the United States, hidden by family members. They had their day in court and were denied the required status to stay. If this is the case, then they should be deported. And if these are the people ICE is looking for, their mission to deport is valid.

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We have the process for being admitted and it should be followed! To do otherwise is unlawful. People who are here lawfully are not afraid to go out.

Stas Chrzanowski, Baltimore

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