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If we must ‘leap’ to a new calendar, how about a 13-month year? | READER COMMENTARY

Johns Hopkins professors Richard Conn Henry and Steve Hanke have came up with a permanent calendar to replace the Gregorian calendar now used by most counties.

I found the article on the Hanke-Henry Permanent Calendar interesting (“Get rid of leap days and start every year on a Monday: Johns Hopkins professors propose a new calendar,” Feb. 21). But with just a couple of minutes thought I came up with an even simpler idea that would make a permanent calendar even easier. In the Liddle Permanent Calendar, every month would begin on a Monday, and every day of the month would always be the same date. For example, the first of every month would be always be a Monday and the 17th of every month would always be a Thursday.

Here is how it would work. Every month would be exactly 28 days or four weeks which easily preserves the seven-day week and Sundays. We would need to add a month and like the Hanke-Henry calendar, a complete week would be added every five or six years.

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So, with thirteen 28-day months, the year would still be exactly 364 days. Everyone would know what day of the week their birthday fell on, as well as everything else — the first day of the school year, your wedding anniversary (no excuse for forgetting) and the banks and Wall Street would have an easy time figuring monthly interest. And so on.

One early problem would be solved after a while ― birthdays. For example, my birthday is the 31st of August. There would never be another 31st of August ever again. Or for that matter any 29th, 30th or 31st of any month. Millions of people would lose their birthdays! But we’d have to suck it up for the greater good. And look at the bright side: If you were fortunate enough to be born on the 29th, 30th or 31st, you’d never have another birthday so you would be forever young.

David A. Liddle, Pasadena

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