xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

A ban on Lasix in Maryland thoroughbred racing is long overdue | READER COMMENTARY

In this May 18, 2019, file photo, jockey Tyler Gaffalione, right, reacts aboard War of Will, as they crosses the finish line first to win the Preakness Stakes horse race at Pimlico Race Course, in Baltimore. The track's ownership recently voiced support for a performance-enhancing diuretic commonly used in racing. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
In this May 18, 2019, file photo, jockey Tyler Gaffalione, right, reacts aboard War of Will, as they crosses the finish line first to win the Preakness Stakes horse race at Pimlico Race Course, in Baltimore. The track's ownership recently voiced support for a performance-enhancing diuretic commonly used in racing. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File) (Steve Helber/AP)

The battle over banning the diuretic Lasix for 2-year-old race horses comes down to this: Some thoroughbred owners and trainers are fighting to keep drugging horses unnecessarily. Every other jurisdiction in the world outside of North America races without Lasix — and has far fewer deaths on the track (”Pimlico owners want state to ban drug widely used on horses on race day,” July 6).

Horse racing is killing horses and the debilitating effects of Lasix may very well contribute to that. Horses who bleed from the lungs from the stress of racing should not be drugged and sent out to risk their lives. They should not race at all.

Advertisement

If trainers and owners are going to dig in their heels at every change proposed to end some of the abuse and suffering in the industry, their motives are clear — the horses’ health comes second to gaining a competitive edge. The Maryland Racing Commission should stand up and do what’s right for the horses.

Kathy Guillermo, Washington, D.C.

Advertisement

The writer is senior vice president for equine matters at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement