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What is the state of Maryland public education? There are conflicting claims. | READER COMMENTARY

From left, Doug Mowbray, Nayeli Garcia Mowbray, Rebecca Yenawine, Pamela Boozer-Strother, and Elle Irby join the hundreds of supporters of the Kirwan education funding bill who descended on Annapolis for a marathon joint hearing on the legislation on Feb. 17, 2020
From left, Doug Mowbray, Nayeli Garcia Mowbray, Rebecca Yenawine, Pamela Boozer-Strother, and Elle Irby join the hundreds of supporters of the Kirwan education funding bill who descended on Annapolis for a marathon joint hearing on the legislation on Feb. 17, 2020 (Amy Davis)

The Kirwan Commission and its supporters, including most of the state legislators, say the sky is falling down and it is essential that we spend an additional $4 billion to save the Maryland public school system from its current state of abysmal mediocrity. But the Maryland State Board of Education says we don’t need to raise high school graduation standards because the current system is already producing successful college students (“Maryland education leaders decide against raising high school graduation requirements,” Feb. 25).

The student board member even says we should de-emphasize academic achievement and promote the development of the whole child. So which is it? Maybe this is something to think about before substantially increasing our tax burden.

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Robert West, Ellicott City

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