Highlights from Night 1 of the Miami Democratic presidential debate.

As we watch the presidential candidates debate, tweet and try to solidify a seat at the top heading into the 2020 election (“Zurawik: Night 2 of Democrats debate hotter, better than a winning Night 1,” June 27), the question of foreign aid must be addressed as there are 130 million girls across the world not enrolled in school. Girls ages 10 to 19 are three times more likely than boys to be kept out of school, particularly in conflict-ridden countries.

The “Keeping Girls in School Act” targets this pressing issue, and if passed will reduce child marriage rates by two-thirds and cut child deaths in half, saving 3 million lives. It will also decrease the likelihood of violent conflict by as much as 37 percent and place $15 trillion to $30 trillion in women’s lifetime earnings into the global economy, bolstering U.S. economic welfare and stability.

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The United States has been a global leader in efforts to expand and improve educational opportunities, exemplified by the “Protecting Girls Access to Education in Vulnerable Settings Act,” co-sponsored by Sens. Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen supported by several of the democratic presidential hopefuls and signed into law in January this year.

I urge these leaders to also voice their support for the “Keeping Girls in School Act,” as completing a secondary education stabilizes the future for women around the world, and in turn our nation.

Samantha Levy, Baltimore

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