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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan shakes hands with state employees Nov. 26. He recently authorized the release of three men sentenced to life in prison for crimes committed as minors, a decision consistent with a 2012 Supreme Court ruling retroactively outlawing mandatory sentences of life without parole for juvenile offenders.
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan shakes hands with state employees Nov. 26. He recently authorized the release of three men sentenced to life in prison for crimes committed as minors, a decision consistent with a 2012 Supreme Court ruling retroactively outlawing mandatory sentences of life without parole for juvenile offenders. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun)

Thank you to The Baltimore Sun Editorial Board on the editorial, “Kudos to Maryland Gov. Hogan for paroling three ‘juvenile lifers,’ but we wish he weren’t involved at all” (Nov. 25).

Maryland’s process is a far cry from responding to what the Supreme Court found to violate the 8th Amendment in Miller v. Alabama and Montgomery v. Louisiana. As your editorial points out, there is precious little possibility for a meaningful assessment of sentences that failed to take juvenile status into account and rehabilitation since.

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Margaret Martin Barry, Washington, D.C.

The writer is visiting professor of law and director of the Re-Entry Clinic at American University Washington College of Law.

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