From left, U.S. District Court Judge Richard D. Bennett, Special Appeals Court Judge Timothy E. Meredith, Anne Arundel Circuit Court Judge Laura S. Kiessling and Family Law Magistrate John F. Gunning discuss technology and social media in the law at a 2017 conference.
From left, U.S. District Court Judge Richard D. Bennett, Special Appeals Court Judge Timothy E. Meredith, Anne Arundel Circuit Court Judge Laura S. Kiessling and Family Law Magistrate John F. Gunning discuss technology and social media in the law at a 2017 conference. (Courtesy photo)

As a practicing lawyer, I am keenly aware that the facts and circumstances of each particular case are considered by a trial judge when issuing a sentence. Publishing or exposing the outcome of that deliberative process, without providing proper context, will lead to misconstrued criticisms of our bench (“The public needs some way to judge the judges,” Feb. 13).

It will also lead judges, whether consciously or unconsciously, to consider the political or public response to their sentences, which is not where we want their minds to be. The judiciary is not supposed to be driven by politics but rather the law and facts of each case.

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Just spend a day in court and you will see that our trial judges work hard to do the right thing and that publication of the sentences alone will lead to true justice not being done.

Alex M. Allman, Forest Hill

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