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Inner Harbor’s future linked to city crime | READER COMMENTARY

A comb jelly swims near the surface of Baltimore's Inner Harbor last October. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun).
A comb jelly swims near the surface of Baltimore's Inner Harbor last October. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun). (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun)

I’ve lived at the Inner Harbor for decades and love the area. It grieves me to watch stores and services disappear due to loss of revenue. The concepts put forward by Sally Scott and Joby Taylor have merit, but when they got on a political rant, my enthusiasm waned (”Re-imagining Baltimore’s Inner Harbor as a place for residents rather than tourists,” March 17).

Baltimore is a majority Black city, and we have the wonderful Reginald Lewis Museum within walking distance of the Inner Harbor. As a member of that museum, I’m sorry it wasn’t mentioned. Also, the Civil War Museum speaks to our history, as does the Flag House, another nearby attraction. But the statement, “Let’s create a harbor that speaks truths to white supremacy,” was an ugly slur against the white people who are my neighbors.

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Then the article about Dick’s Last Resort’s unpaid rent exemplifies Inner Harbor reality. According to an earlier statement from Ryan Carlson, director of operations for Deja vu Services, which owns Dicks, “downtown Baltimore is a complete hellhole, dumpster fire of violence and danger.” He went on, “Nobody in their right mind would operate a business there.”

Until crime and the perception of danger are brought under control, there is no way anyone can “re-imagine” the Inner Harbor. This is a fact the city has to address.

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Rosalind Nester Heid, Baltimore

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