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Pressure to raise wages of service workers? That’s a good thing. | READER COMMENTARY

Nette Stokes, executive director of the non-profit JustLiving Advocacy Inc., has been helping families and single mothers with child care needs using CARES Act funding. She is pictured at Grace Early Learning Center in Elkridge. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun).
Nette Stokes, executive director of the non-profit JustLiving Advocacy Inc., has been helping families and single mothers with child care needs using CARES Act funding. She is pictured at Grace Early Learning Center in Elkridge. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun). (Kenneth K. Lam)

We will have inflation and this time it’s for the cause of good. Due to COVID-19, restaurant workers, health care workers and other service jobs are being stressed to where it’s not worth the effort, especially when higher paying jobs are available without the hassles and health threats. We have long underappreciated the service sector, as shown by the pay difference to manufacturing jobs even though both may require equal levels of education (”Why hiring for child care remains a huge struggle,” Sept. 21).

Nurses and teachers, traditionally female, have long been underpaid for the service they bring to the community. COVID has shown how important these and the service jobs are to our economy. No government mandate will be needed to take the minimum wage to $15, the market will do it for their work. Inflation will will not be an economy out of control but what Wall Street calls a “market adjustment” to right past underestimates of work value.

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Jim Martin, Middle River

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