xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

When it comes to fighting disease, immunizations are essential | READER COMMENTARY

The performance of a new coronavirus vaccine is tested at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, but the finished product remains in production. In the meantime, doctors on the front lines of the coronavirus fight are looking to drugs that are already approved for treating other diseases.
The performance of a new coronavirus vaccine is tested at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, but the finished product remains in production. In the meantime, doctors on the front lines of the coronavirus fight are looking to drugs that are already approved for treating other diseases. (MONICA HERNDON/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS)

The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated our vulnerability to infectious diseases and the value of prevention and immunization (“Maryland reports deadliest single-day coronavirus toll with 68 new victims; Hogan not yet ready to begin state’s reopening,” April 21). Globally, immunizations have saved millions of lives. While we hope for a COVID-19 vaccine in the future, we cannot ignore the need to maintain vaccination rates for other diseases now.

Despite current social distancing and closures, children need their immunizations. Most pediatric practices, clinics and hospitals are open to provide this essential service, making efforts to separate well visits from sick visits. While telemedicine has expanded, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention prioritize in-person newborn care, and well visits and immunization for infants and children.

Advertisement

Amid this current crisis, we cannot risk having an outbreak of measles or other infectious diseases that are prevented by effective and safe vaccines. Immunizations are essential.

Tina L. Cheng, M.D., M.P.H., and Maria Brown, M.D., Baltimore

Advertisement

The writers are, respectively, pediatrician-In-chief of Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and president of the Maryland chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement