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Readers Respond

Too many show ignorance about border, immigration

A reader suggests that Sun editors believe in open borders and that foreign nationals have been able to enter into our country with relative ease. He goes on to suggest that this situation would be acceptable if only immigrant flow were in both directions (“Sun ignores illegal immigration threat,” Jan. 22). The letter displays the degree of ignorance that is so often associated with immigration at our borders.

To begin, the assertion that we have had open borders until now or that anyone, Democrat or Republican, advocates for open borders is a bald-faced lie concocted by our ever truth denying president and his acolytes at Fox News. Actually, our borders have been tightly controlled for the last 50 years or so, and far more effectively and compassionately than at present. To illustrate, 1.6 million people were arrested trying to cross the border illegally in 2000 compared to just 400,000 last year. In other words, there were more arrests and more effective border control 20 years ago than at present.

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Last year, Mr. Trump’s first year in office, arrests at the border were the lowest since 1971. In truth, most illegal immigrants are not those who crossed the border illegally, but rather they are those who entered legally and overstayed their departure dates, and most of them came over from Canada.

As far as the desire to see traffic flow in both directions, the Pew Research Center reports that from 2009 to 2014, more than 1 million Mexicans left the United States to return to Mexico, compared to 870,000 Mexicans who entered the country. It appears that a wall might keep more immigrants in the United States than it would keep out.

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Finally, it is interesting to note that every person in Congress along our Southern border, from both parties, opposes the border wall, arguing that it would not improve security. Readers who wish to enlighten your readership with their views would do well to check their facts before composing their letters.

Jack Kinstlinger, Towson


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