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Speeding makes I-83 unsafe

The rate of crashes on the Jones Falls Expressway/Interstate 83 in Baltimore is more than twice as high as other comparable Maryland highways, according to a new study. (Ulysses Muñoz / Baltimore Sun video)

I read with interest the article on the high rate of accidents on I-83 and the proposed solutions (“Crash rate on I-83 in Baltimore more than double that of other highways, study finds. How can it be fixed?” Feb. 13).

Being a resident of Baltimore, I frequently drive I-83 and have observed that other than business hours, the average speed is about 80 MPH on a road that was built for speeds at 55 MPH. I would challenge anyone to drive at 55 MPH and count the number of cars that approach you at high rates of speed, weave in and out of lanes and generally make the road unsafe.

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I found it humorous that professionals doing the study couldn’t come up with a correlation that single vehicle crashes make up more than 40 percent of the total and the hour with the highest level of crashes was 2 a.m.. Has anyone reviewed patrol statistics for I-83? I might suggest that speeding during the hours not related to business commuting and bars closing at 2 a.m. could be the answer.

I might also add that I rarely see the road patrolled other than an occasional state trooper at Ruxton Rd., which everyone who drives I-83 knows. Therefore, instead of spending millions of dollars on signs and technology, why don’t we fund several unmarked vehicles to patrol I-83 for six months and witness the remarkable improvement in the crash statistics?

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This will save lives and taxpayers millions.

Scott Wilfong

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