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Baltimore County schools demonstrate how not to conduct hybrid learning | READER COMMENTARY

Chris Hynes, assistant principal of Mount Airy Middle School in Carroll County, speaks in an hour-long video with details about the hybrid learning model. (Handout/Baltimore Sun)
Chris Hynes, assistant principal of Mount Airy Middle School in Carroll County, speaks in an hour-long video with details about the hybrid learning model. (Handout/Baltimore Sun) (Screengrab)

In the article, “Internet capacity problems disrupt Baltimore County classes” (April 8), Lillian Reed reports that Baltimore County “administrators sent a memo to schools last week to remind them that students do not need to log on if they’re attending in person.”

This is a terrible idea and suggests that the public school system has not researched the lessons learned by businesses who have had combined local and remote workers. If you observe a meeting where some are in-person and some are remote, generally the remote people might as well have not bothered to attend. It’s very difficult for them to participate at all, and they are routinely ignored by those in the room.

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The mantra for successful meetings in such hybrid situations is: “If one is remote, then all are remote.” It’s highly recommended that even those in the room communicate through the same online tools that others not in the room are using. This puts everyone on an equal footing.

If the schools do not have the internet capacity to do this, perhaps they are not ready for starting a return of students. An unequal opportunity with some remote and some in person is worse than having all the students attending from home.

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George Dinwiddie, Pasadena

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