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Torturing animals is nothing to celebrate

Hunting deer at the Great Dismal Swamp. Photo courtesy of Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries
Hunting deer at the Great Dismal Swamp. Photo courtesy of Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (Eugene Hester, DGIF / HANDOUT)

The author of "If you deer, you’ve got to love deer hunting” (Dec. 6), writes that although he has never gone deer hunting so far, he's looking forward to going out with a sniper friend of his to try it.

Well, that's no big stretch, considering he's an admitted fisherman and already proved himself to be a bully. How else to describe someone who enjoys a pastime of dragging fish out of water and watching them suffocate and suffer to death gasping to breathe? Fish are sensitive creatures not meant to be handled. Their soft bodies are very prone to damage. These poor sensitive creatures, when caught, suffer terribly from fishermen’s big groping hands that rip through the fish's lungs when they are held up by the gills and other tortuous methods of handling. Even catch-return fishermen kid themselves if they think a lot of fish don't die as a result of the trauma and violence inflicted on them by hooks in them and by people handling them.

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So how does the author justify fishing? Too many again? Need to be controlled to ease possible conflicts? Bull. It's all just an excuse to do exactly what he wants to do, which is to cause pain and suffering to other creatures legally.

Wild creatures are fighting to live their lives the way they were meant to and already have to endure dwindling habitats, pollution and trash people inflict on this earth everyday. And as for the bow-hunting the author said he would like to try, it's one of the cruelest methods of hunting there is. All you have to do is read about the number of injured suffering animals trying to get around with an arrow stuck in an infected, festering limb to know that.

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The author ends his commentary trying to make a joke of urging hunters to be careful and not mistake him for a deer in the brush when he goes out to hunt soon. And yet he doesn't get the irony of not wanting to get shot as he's out trying to shoot some other innocent creature.

Mary Beth Malooly

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