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Don't walk away from Baltimore's hungry

The commentary by Carmen Del Guercio, "Proposed cuts to anti-hunger programs 'most significant' in decades" (Aug. 16), speaks volumes about the challenges that Marylanders are facing. As executive director of House of David, Advocates for Fathers, Inc., I have first-hand experience with returning citizens who are working to transition back to our community.

Outreach, advocacy and empathy go a long way to ensure that they escape poverty and connect to both employment and families. However, the cuts suggested by the Trump administration will hurt far more than the men that my organization serves. They will also negatively impact children, seniors and the disabled, and they will exacerbate the food deserts that already exist in our city.

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There is a role for charity to address hunger in our community and Baltimore has many charitable programs. But to ignore the fact that more than 600,000 Marylanders utilize the supplemental nutrition program (SNAP) is to ignore reality, a reality that I see every day. Taking away their food won't make our state great. It will make our state hungrier, less healthy and even more impoverished.

David Clements, Baltimore

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The writer is executive director of House of David, Advocates for Fathers

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