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Howard County schools are segregated because housing is segregated

Alice Chen 12, center, who can see River Hill High from her backyard, might be redistricted out of the high school. She made the signs she and mother Fen Han are holding in protest. Anti-redistricting plan parents and students demonstrate at Howard County School Board headquarters.
Alice Chen 12, center, who can see River Hill High from her backyard, might be redistricted out of the high school. She made the signs she and mother Fen Han are holding in protest. Anti-redistricting plan parents and students demonstrate at Howard County School Board headquarters. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun)

What I took away from your coverage of the racial and financial segregation in Howard County and its schools as reported recently in the Howard County News section is that Dr. Martirano, the Howard County schools superintendent, will not be satisfied until every school in our system gets a Title I ranking, along with the resultant high teacher turnovers and resultant large number of inexperienced teachers and high busing expenditures (“Howard County’s redistricting plan: Progress but not pain-free,” Sept. 10).

The current situation will not be solved by transferring 7,400 children, but by ensuring that developers are no longer allowed to opt out of providing low income housing as is currently the case in places like Maple Lawn, Turf Valley, River Hill and Downtown Columbia, and that real estate agencies are required to stop their current unwritten, but obvious segregation policies.

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B. H. Meyer, Elkridge

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