Advertisement

Hopkins protesters got away with breaking the law

Johns Hopkins protesters and students share their displeasure over the creation of a private police force and the university's contracts with ICE. (Jerry Jackson / Baltimore Sun video)

So, after a month long sit-in, the Johns Hopkins nightmare is over (“The lessons of the Hopkins occupation,” May 8).

As a result of disgruntled students and outsiders, countless of other students, administrators and employees were inconvenienced. Countless hours of public safety officer time was wasted and all lawbreakers (what they are) received amnesty from the university and/or state charges that will be dropped by the fiat of Marilyn Mosby. All, ostensibly, for an issue that was solved constitutionally by the passing of a law allowing Johns Hopkins to better protect its various constituencies, including the public which it serves.

Advertisement

So, what does Johns Hopkins President Ron Daniels say to all of those who followed the rules and did not break the law? What does State’s Attorney Mosby explain to poor inner city youth arrested for disorderly conduct or trespassing who have been prosecuted?

There may be something to the claims of excess privilege for certain groups after all.

F. Patrick Hughes, Baltimore

Advertisement
Advertisement