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Hopkins protest should never have been allowed

Signs cover the walls inside of Garland Hall during the sit-in. At Johns Hopkins University, a group of students sat in the university's administration building for weeks as part of their protest against private police.
Signs cover the walls inside of Garland Hall during the sit-in. At Johns Hopkins University, a group of students sat in the university's administration building for weeks as part of their protest against private police. (Ulysses Munoz / Baltimore Sun)

I read your article about the Garland Hall month-long occupation, and I was sickened and horrified (“The lessons of the Hopkins occupation,” May 8). I attended Johns Hopkins for four years from 1980-1984. I received a master’s degree in chemistry.

When I was there, I knew a lot of the undergrads. They were almost to a man (or woman) extremely focused and hard working. They were all heads down, laser focused on finishing their degrees. These were serious young people who were there for business. I can't even imagine those students taking part in this nonsense at Garland Hall. This crop of undergrads who would do this is way below the standards of the undergrads I knew.

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And then there is Hopkins President Ronald J. Daniels. He allowed a group of students and outside agitators to disrupt the university’s operations for a month, causing problems to the majority of students who are there to work hard and get their degrees. The protesters should have been removed after 30 minutes, not 30 days. And they should not receive a slap on the wrist but be expelled from school and made to reapply. This would never have happened under Milton Eisenhower.

President Daniels has done Hopkins a great disservice and is not worthy of leading this great institution. He let down the majority of students who are trying to do their work and complete their degrees in favor of spoiled entitled snowflakes who think they have a right to disrupt other peoples efforts to get a degree. He should step down or be fired so they can find a person who values the heritage and history of The Johns Hopkins University and is willing to protect it.

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Avraham Sonenthal, Baltimore

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