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Baltimore can't afford to put Hopkins at risk

A Johns Hopkins University campus security guard is stationed at North Charles and 33rd streets. The school has proposed establishing a private police force to mixed reactions from the community. File.
A Johns Hopkins University campus security guard is stationed at North Charles and 33rd streets. The school has proposed establishing a private police force to mixed reactions from the community. File. (The Baltimore Sun)

Dan Rodricks is right. His column, “Questions about a Hopkins police force are not ridiculous, but they don't win the argument, either” (Feb. 12), addresses many solid arguments in favor of a Johns Hopkins police force, but he did not mention the single most important one: When people face fear they are driven to deal with it by fighting what causes the fear or fleeing from it.

While not a popular subject, has anyone in the city’s leadership ever thought that the five-star and internationally-renowned-for-decades Hopkins brand would be a highly-coveted crown jewel that would be welcomed in many places across the country? Have other states and cities ever pondered having a world class organization like Hopkins moving to their area? Probably they have, but until the next Freddie Gray scale riots break out in Baltimore, Hopkins may want to stay put. Of course, having members of their staff and students carjacked, robbed, mugged, raped, shot or murdered while on campus might convince the Hopkins’ leadership that it is now time to move to a safe area.

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Can Baltimore afford to lose its single finest asset due to negligence in protecting them from danger?

Dan Crumpler

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