xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Don't ignore mental illness among homeless

Belongings of the homeless crowd a downtown Los Angeles sidewalk in Skid Row in late May.
Belongings of the homeless crowd a downtown Los Angeles sidewalk in Skid Row in late May. (Frederic J. Brown / AFP/Getty Images)

Homelessness in the United States is a complex problem that stems from many causes. But The Sun is wrong to dismiss mental illness as a significant contributing factor (“Want to address homelessness, Mr. President? Two words: affordable housing,” July 2). Depending on the type of mental illness, between 25% and 45% of people who are homeless currently struggle with some form of mental illness.

Co-occurring effects ranging from the agency of the mentally ill, lack of adequate medical care and the exhaustion of family care-givers compound the problem. More affordable housing, public housing, decriminalization and a higher minimum wage may all help, but none of these will address the root cause of mental illness. To ignore nearly 50% of a problem is dishonest.

Advertisement

Frank Fillmore, Baltimore

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement