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Maryland’s Republican governor may be a closeted reformer | READER COMMENTARY

Maryland Senate President Bill Ferguson, left, Gov. Larry Hogan and House of Delegates Speaker Adrienne A. Jones sign bills into law on April 13, 2021, the day after the annual 90-day Maryland General Assembly session. (Pamela Wood/Baltimore Sun).
Maryland Senate President Bill Ferguson, left, Gov. Larry Hogan and House of Delegates Speaker Adrienne A. Jones sign bills into law on April 13, 2021, the day after the annual 90-day Maryland General Assembly session. (Pamela Wood/Baltimore Sun). (Pamela Wood)

The Baltimore Sun was right to call out Gov. Larry Hogan for his unfortunate and arrogant rhetoric about Mayor Brandon Scott’s police reform ideas (“Political talking points: good theater, bad crime strategy,” April 12).

Governor Hogan, in defending the unsatisfactory status quo, is on the wrong side of this debate, as recent events demonstrate. His vetoes of police reform and juvenile justice bills from the General Assembly seem to further illustrate his recalcitrance on these issues.

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On the other hand, he issued his vetoes while the General Assembly was still in session, knowing full well that they would be almost immediately overridden. He could have delayed his vetoes until after the General Assembly adjourned which would have ,killed the reforms at least until next January.

As a result, Mr. Hogan gets his tough-guy-Republican talking points and Maryland gets meaningful police and juvenile justice reforms. That’s a good deal any day.

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George Kaplan, Colora

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