xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Cheers to law firm’s $12.5M HBCU donation | READER COMMENTARY

In this March 24, 2021 file photo, Maryland House Speaker Adrienne A. Jones, third from left, points up while standing with the presidents of Maryland's four historically Black colleges and universities after a bill signing ceremony in Bowie. Maryland officials announced weeks earlier that they had finalized the settlement with attorneys to end a 15-year-old federal lawsuit relating to underfunding at the state’s four HBCUs. On Nov. 18, 2021, plaintiff's lawyers at Kirkland & Ellis announced they are donating $12.5 million in legal fees to the schools. (AP Photo/Brian Witte, File)
In this March 24, 2021 file photo, Maryland House Speaker Adrienne A. Jones, third from left, points up while standing with the presidents of Maryland's four historically Black colleges and universities after a bill signing ceremony in Bowie. Maryland officials announced weeks earlier that they had finalized the settlement with attorneys to end a 15-year-old federal lawsuit relating to underfunding at the state’s four HBCUs. On Nov. 18, 2021, plaintiff's lawyers at Kirkland & Ellis announced they are donating $12.5 million in legal fees to the schools. (AP Photo/Brian Witte, File) (Brian Witte/AP)

As a proud, successful graduate of Morgan State University, one of Maryland’s historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), I wish to thank and give kudos to the law firm of Kirkland & Ellis for its generous, totally unselfish donation of its 15-year settlement fee of $12.5 million to selected HBCUs and non-profits (”Law firm that won settlement in Maryland HBCU case is donating $12.5M in fees,” Nov. 18).

This settlement will serve to provide funding to the college education of many minority students. Noteworthy is the fact that minority students attending HBCUs have increased levels of engagement, more interactions with faculty and greater environment with faculty-reserved projects. Also duly noted, HBCUs have a history of providing a greater wealth of services than their predominantly white university counterparts, thus ensuring a higher graduation rate among minority students.

Advertisement

Ron Owens, Baltimore

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement