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Halloween should be fun, not 'politically correct'

“Halloweekend” on college campuses is always highly anticipated. Dorms are decorated with fake cobwebs and spiders, festive events are happening all week, and there are the infamous Halloween parties. As a college student, I’ve seen costumes ranging from devils to nuns (“What makes a Halloween costume offensive? In Baltimore, debate rages on,” Oct. 26).

Yet my friend was wary of dressing up as the Disney movie character Moana this year after hearing of people being shamed for wearing that costume derived from Samoan culture. Why are we being shamed for celebrating Halloween traditions?

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Yale University actually fired staff members for even suggesting that students should make their own costume choices. A student at Notre Dame has said that it is shameful to wear a headdress and war paint — unless you are Native American.

Granted, some people are vulgar and crude about their costume choice. But not everyone has the intent to “dehumanize an entire population” by simply wearing a sombrero.

If we want to be a more united society, we have to embrace each other’s cultures. Even if there were rules set on what types of costumes are and aren’t permitted, where would we draw the line? Since sharing culture seems to offend people, should members of racial and ethnic minorities be banned from dressing up as Caucasians?

Another sensitive topic is religion. Should nun and priest costumes be banned as well? The list of potentially offensive costumes goes on and on. It would be impossible to honor everyone’s wishes without being left with little or nothing at all to wear on Halloween.

Hannah DuBois

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