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Gun-toting monster kids don't just appear

Mayor Catherine E. Pugh and Baltimore Police Commissioner Darryl De Sousa addressed the students, who later participated in a 17 minute “lie-in” to honor the Florida victims. Pugh said the city plans to spend an estimated $100,000 to send students on a fleet of free buses to the national march in Washington planned for later this month.

I am not writing this letter in support of guns, I am writing this because I am against simplistic answers to complex issues (“Baltimore student protests and the $100,000 field trip,” March 7). I think back to my days as a student, and I can remember two troubled kids who just did not "fit in.” Every day of school was a living hell for them. They were constantly the butt of jokes by their fellow students and sometimes the teachers, too. One of them was dead by the time he was 30, and I do not know what happened to the other.

These events happened in the 1950s. If they happened in this day and age, the students could easily have been school shooters. I am troubled that we did not reach out to these people. What I am trying to say is the students and teachers actually bear a large part of the responsibility of creating these monsters. If the students and teachers care so much, their time and effort would be put to much better use in trying to help these people.

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They know who they are. Once these students are identified, they need to get mental health help in the school and there must be an effort made by the students and teachers to make their day to day life in school better.

Harold Mendelson, Owings Mills

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