xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

U.S. will never escape its gun violence | READER COMMENTARY

In this image from body-camera footage provided by the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office, deputies approach a set of doors with their weapons drawn inside a building at the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority bus and rail yard after hearing shots fired from beyond the doors, Wednesday, May 26, 2021, in San Jose, California. The footage shows that a gunman who killed nine co-workers at the facility shot himself twice in the head as sheriff’s deputies raced into the building. (Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office via AP)
In this image from body-camera footage provided by the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office, deputies approach a set of doors with their weapons drawn inside a building at the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority bus and rail yard after hearing shots fired from beyond the doors, Wednesday, May 26, 2021, in San Jose, California. The footage shows that a gunman who killed nine co-workers at the facility shot himself twice in the head as sheriff’s deputies raced into the building. (Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office via AP) (AP)

Dan Rodricks, in his column, “From Baltimore to San Jose, no end in sight to cycle of gun violence” (June 1), says that “trying to stop gun violence on the scale that’s needed seems like a hopeless exercise.” It is not just hopeless; it is now impossible.

The national self-image of the macho gunslinger protecting his town and the stalwart rifle-toting pioneer protecting his land are so embedded in the national DNA that even the Supreme Court forgot about the first part of the Second Amendment when it ruled in the District of Columbia v. Heller that an individual had the right to own a gun. That decision carved in stone the gun culture of the United States.

Advertisement

The tipping point when it became clear that there was no going back was the murder of 20 students and six staff at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The only response was that Americans bought more guns. So, sorry to say, Dan, but gun violence is now a normal part of American life. I guess we could all start wearing bulletproof vests.

N.L. Bruggman, Jarrettsville

Advertisement
Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement