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Blame criminals, not their guns

Students at Excel Academy in West Baltimore haven’t experienced a school shooting, but have lost seven schoolmates to street gun violence in the last year and a half, and can share stories going back decades about the outsize role guns have played in their lives and the impact it has had on them. (Ulysses Muñoz, Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun video)

I have had enough of House Speaker Michael E. Busch and I can't take it any longer. Why is it always the gun and never the person holding the gun (“If federal government won’t control guns, Md. will,” March 7)? The politicians love to say how much they are for the rights of gun owners and sportsmen while they take more of their rights away. They love to talk about a few particular semi-automatic rifles. As if getting rid of them will make us safe forever. What a joke. Maryland has some of the nation’s strictest gun laws now, but Speaker Busch thinks he can pass some more and they will make the difference. Politicians love the phrase, “common-sense gun laws.” Like they had any common-sense. If Mr. Busch does, I have not seen any yet.

Thank God for Maryland’s handgun review board. They are using common sense to help individuals protect themselves, something local and state police can't do. The only thing in Mr. Busch’s commentary that made any sense at all is looking at the "red flag law," but this has to be done very carefully. Because it could be used by government to really step on our rights.

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In 1988 a bill was passed to get rid of Saturday Night Specials, the small caliber handguns that were easily concealed. When the bill was passed, it was said that our streets will be a lot safer. I lived in Pigtown then, which at the time was not a bad place to live, especially the 1100 block of Sargeant Street — until the police of the Southern District decided to allow an open air drug market to exist on the corner of Sargeant and Ostend streets in 1992.

That’s when my 23-year-old son walked down our street and was assaulted by drug dealers. He defended himself, and we broke up the attack. As my son walked away, he was shot by one of your controlled guns which was in the hands of an uncontrolled thug criminal. When the police don't protect you, you only have one option, and that is the right to carry. I have never been a member of the NRA, but because of people like Mr. Busch, I think it is time to join.

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Brian Jackson, Linthicum Heights

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