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Good grammar can’t fix every shortcoming | READER COMMENTARY

What is cheugy or non-trendy? Some common examples gleaned from Instagram, TikTok and Twitter include graphic T-shirts, skinny jeans and low-top Converse. (Yunkiphotoshot/Dreamstime).
What is cheugy or non-trendy? Some common examples gleaned from Instagram, TikTok and Twitter include graphic T-shirts, skinny jeans and low-top Converse. (Yunkiphotoshot/Dreamstime). (Dreamstime/TNS)

As someone whose epitaph will read, “I’m silently correcting your grammar,” I appreciated the recent letter to the editor from Lynn Agress (”A guide to better grammar ‘irregardless’ of your current practice,” Dec. 17). Whether spoken or in print, grammatical errors, jargon and slang irk me. However, as a speaker and a writer, I must acknowledge that language is a living thing, used to communicate. If most people understand a word to mean a particular thing, even though it may not accurately or precisely describe that thing, the word is useful. Sometimes, I like to flex to show I’m not “cheugy,” though my children may order me to “skrt.” That makes me feel salty, no cap. I think I’m on “fleek” while they’re throwing shade. But they understand me perfectly.

Meanwhile, changing the sign at Graul’s Market from “Less than 10 items in this lane” to “Fewer than 10 items” won’t change anyone’s ability to count. There certainly ought to be a word for people who get in the express lane with too many items. I vote for “twitch” as a synonym for jerk. “The twitch thought six oranges counted as one item!”

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Use it at will. You’re welcome.

Renee Hamidi, Towson

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