A man walks by some intriguing graffiti in East Baltimore.
A man walks by some intriguing graffiti in East Baltimore. (Posted by Kevin Moore, Community Contributor)

For 15 years in the ’80s, I was chairman of the Maryland Transit Administration’s anti-vandalism committee (“Graffiti appears on Pulaski Monument in Patterson Park, group says,” May 23). The intent of our action committee was the elimination of graffiti on MARC cars, MTA buses, light rail cars and MTA properties — including bus shelters.

MTA police, in cooperation with Baltimore police, were charged with arresting and prosecuting vandals in the act of destroying property by “tagging” it or covering an entire wall or side of a MARC or Metro Rail car. Tagging is also used to mark territories. In general, the more graffiti you observe in a community, the more it indicates that community is in decline.

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Graffiti is not an art form. Graffiti vandals choose areas where the most exposure will be gained. Those caught in the act are subject to charges of a misdemeanor under Maryland state law. Let’s rid our communities of trash and graffiti. Call police if you observe graffiti being applied to any transit property or public or private structure.

Jerry Korzybski, Havre De Grace

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