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Stop discouraging food trucks

Joann Calwell, Jolly Pig food truck owner talks about a new bill in the Generall Assembly that would streamline the way food trucks are licensed and inspected across the state. (Kim Hairston, Baltimore Sun video)

The article on Baltimore County's food truck laws highlights the huge benefits food trucks and vendors can have on the community ("Baltimore County is 'wide open' territory for food trucks and entrepreneurs," June 20). But Baltimore County should do even more to promote mobile vending by eliminating its proximity ban.

Everyone benefits from a thriving food truck scene, from under-served business parks to residents looking for new and fun dining options. Even local brick-and-mortar businesses benefit from the increased foot traffic generated by food trucks .Baltimore County can do more and should learn from Baltimore City's mistakes. For the past year, Baltimore City has been actively defending a lawsuit challenging its unconstitutional 300-foot ban, which keeps food trucks out of the city, instead of listening to what Baltimoreans want: more food trucks.

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Food truck entrepreneurs are hungry for opportunity, and Baltimore County's communities are hungry for their food. Just look at cities like Washington, D.C., Austin and Los Angeles that have thriving food truck and restaurant industries because they don't play favorites. Baltimore County and city officials would serve their residents well by following those cities' lead.

Greg Reed, Arlington, Va.

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The writer is an attorney at the Institute for Justice which is representing two Baltimore food trucks in litigation against the city.

Send letters to the editor to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

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