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Global food crisis requires U.S. intervention | READER COMMENTARY

A recent article, “How did Russia-Ukraine war trigger a food crisis?” (June 18), highlighted how the Russian war in Ukraine is exacerbating food shortages around the world. In low-income countries that rely on wheat, corn and sunflower oil imports, this scarcity, along with rising inflation rates, has become a severe humanitarian crisis.

Addressing the current food emergency is critical, but we also need to tackle the broader issue of global malnutrition, which is the underlying cause of nearly half of all preventable deaths of children under age 5. The U.S. needs to take action to support suffering families around the world. Recently, the Global Malnutrition Prevention and Treatment Act of 2021 (H.R.4693) was passed out of the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations committee. The bipartisan bill directs the U.S. to focus on evidence-based, high-impact interventions, like ready-to-use therapeutic foods, breastfeeding support, prenatal vitamins and vitamin A supplements. It would make our foreign aid more effective and impactful on marginalized communities.

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I want to thank U.S. Sens. Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen, both of whom are co-sponsors of this critical bill. Now, I urge them to encourage Senate leadership to bring this bill to the floor for a vote. Their support could save millions of children from starvation.

— Katie Fleischer, Washington, D.C.

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The writer is an advocacy associate with RESULTS, a nonpartisan anti-poverty organization.

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