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There’s a logic in withholding city taxes | READER COMMENTARY

Cobblestones glisten on Thames Street at the end of Broadway in a view at Fells Point last year. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun).
Cobblestones glisten on Thames Street at the end of Broadway in a view at Fells Point last year. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun). (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)

Basically, the city is unable to control crime and violence in Baltimore. The recent violence in Fells Point was the final straw that broke the camel’s back. Businesses finally have had enough of city incapability to carry out the duties that they are responsible for accomplishing (“Fells Point community concerns are valid; threatening to extort Baltimore to fix them is not,” June 9). Frustration levels are high causing the businesses to threaten to withhold taxes.

Taxes support the city administration including Mayor Brandon Scott and members of the Baltimore City Council. Sometimes, I think those people forget they work for us in running the city. Holding them to task is an interesting concept and just maybe, they have been acting as if they are untouchable.

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What if all residents refused to pay the sales tax when purchasing items? They could claim the crime rate is too high, city schools are under par, city services including trash removal are not meeting the needs of the citizens. To go along with this move, cut the salaries of those elected officials if they are not doing their jobs.

If the city tries to shut the businesses down, they hurt themselves even more by loss of revenue and more unemployed people on the rolls. Wow, an interesting concept. If only this could come to fruition.

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Stas Chrzanowski, Baltimore

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