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I am very worried that the legislative branch of our government is about to destroy the judicial branch of our government. I can see a future where no reputable candidate would possibly accept an invitation to become a Supreme Court justice.

If Sen. Dianne Feinstein had the accusatory letter in her possession when she privately questioned Judge Brett Kavanaugh, it was her duty to tell him and to give him an opportunity to withdraw his nomination or to defend his position (“GOP warns time running out for Brett Kavanaugh’s accuser to talk,” Sept. 20). If she knew later than her private interview, it was her duty to make him aware of the letter at her first opportunity. It is unacceptable that she waited until the last minute in order to do the most damage possible to his reputation.

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There are very few, if any, who can withstand scrutiny that goes back to their high school days. I am sure that if this extreme scrutiny is carried out, we will soon reach a point where we have a Supreme Court that no longer will have nine members. Each party is so polarized that no matter who the candidate is he or she will not be acceptable to the opposite party.

While we are on the subject of scrutiny, Senator Feinstein is a member of a body that has paid numerous settlements on behalf of those accused of inappropriate behavior. The names of the members of the Congress who are defended by that fund are kept secret from the public in order to spare them of the embarrassment. We, the public, should not allow that secret fund to exist. I want to have the House and Senate members to face the same scrutiny they so readily apply to others.

Harold Mendelson, Owings Mills

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