xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

No more tax gifts to corporations

While it is exciting to see Baltimore residents finally demand fair taxation (“Activists rally for Hopkins, other nonprofits to ‘pay their fair share’ as Baltimore council reviews tax deal,” Dec. 20), an ever bigger target is being ignored: the private, and very profitable, corporations that have received millions — billions? — of our tax dollars in gifts and subsidies.

One billion dollars has gone to the Port Covington project, including a proposed $660 million in city bonds that we’re responsible for. Under Armour purchased roughly 50 acres in the area from Kevin Plank for $70.3 million in 2016 (should we call him a Welfare King?)

Advertisement

One Inner Harbor hotel, owned by a politically connected family, pays $1 a year in property taxes. Harbor Point Development got $107 million. And how about the two “publicly-owned” stadiums?

The list goes on, while public schools have no heat and no AC, while teachers have to appeal for school supplies as a charity, while our sewers overflow every time it rains, and while we have 14,000 residents on the waiting list for public housing.

Advertisement

Yes, ask the non-profits to pay up, but go after the big dogs, too. The refusal of the City Council to even look at these gross imbalances should be an example of why a one-party rule has been a failure for 99% of Baltimore residents.

The whole council should be impeached for practicing checks and balances — you send me a campaign check and I will balance my vote. A perfect illustration of quid pro quo, isn’t it?

Bill Barry, Baltimore

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement