xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Maryland lawmakers should support right to repair law | READER COMMENTARY

An e-waste worker in Nevada County, California wades through a sea of electronic items dropped at Mount St. Mary's School for their annual recycling event on Oct. 10, 2020. (Elias Funez/The Union via AP)
An e-waste worker in Nevada County, California wades through a sea of electronic items dropped at Mount St. Mary's School for their annual recycling event on Oct. 10, 2020. (Elias Funez/The Union via AP) (Elias Funez/AP)

If you’re like me, you’ve probably had the experience of having to replace an old cellphone. If you’re really like me, you’ve had the far more frustrating experience of having to replace a cellphone that isn’t old at all! The Baltimore Sun’s recent editorial on Maryland’s proposed “right to repair” legislation made me realize that I’m not the only one with this problem — thousands of Marylanders deal with planned obsolescence every year (”Maryland consumers should have a ‘right to repair’ electronics,” Feb. 12).

That’s why I was so excited to read about the new bill. What Sen. Katie Fry Hester and Del. Jessica Feldmark are proposing is a simple solution to a problem that impacts everyone I know. In short, they’re saying that electronics manufacturers should empower consumers to fix the electronics that we’ve bought and own. It’s not a new idea — Massachusetts passed a similar law for cars in 2012 and 75% of voters supported it in a referendum last year.

Advertisement

Right to repair wouldn’t make my cellphone’s battery last longer. It would help me replace that broken battery for far less than the cost of a new phone. That’s worth pushing for and I hope the state legislature does the right thing by passing this proposal.

Tim Shade, Baltimore

Advertisement
Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement