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Risk of early voting is real but very, very small | READER COMMENTARY

In Maryland, you don't usually need to present any photo identification to vote unless one of the following occurs: You registered by mail and have not previously met the identification requirements. Someone in the polling place challenges your identity. You are registering to vote during early voting or changing your address during early voting.

Letter writer David Griggs made a valid point about early voting in the primary (”Voting too early runs the risk of wasting your vote,” Aug. 24). I actually voted early for a candidate who had dropped out by the day of the primary vote.

While it’s true that a candidate could die or be arrested during the early voting for the general election, such situations are much rarer than the dropout of the presidential candidates after the early primaries and before the Maryland primary.

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Early voting makes it much easier for voters to exercise their right to vote. Early voters should be aware that their candidate might die or be arrested after they vote, but before Election Day. Then they can decide whether they want to take that risk or wait until the last minute to vote. Such waiting could lead to very long lines on Election Day, and their candidate could still die or get arrested the following day.

Henry Farkas, Pikesville

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