xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

Don’t ignore impact COVID-19 is sure to have on domestic violence | READER COMMENTARY

Exterior of the Baltimore Child Abuse Center at 2300 N. Charles Street. The center provides children who suffered trauma from sexual abuse, witnessing homicide, domestic violence victims or other crimes with medical and mental health treatment. Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun.
Exterior of the Baltimore Child Abuse Center at 2300 N. Charles Street. The center provides children who suffered trauma from sexual abuse, witnessing homicide, domestic violence victims or other crimes with medical and mental health treatment. Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun.

Thank you for writing about a subject that is so often taboo in regular life (“A side effect of coronavirus: More domestic violence and fewer victims seeking help, Maryland experts warn,” March 29). However, the article failed to ask if there are any plans in place to respond to a growing need for help. Will Maryland increase shelter beds or domestic violence response funding?

The House of Ruth shelter tends to be full on a normal day. The likelihood is that service organizations are not going to be able to handle this for us. We all need to look out for people we think may be at risk. Clergy, politicians, celebrities should help raise awareness by letting everyone know (survivors, abusers, their families and communities) that the pandemic does not make abuse acceptable. It is not something that must be quietly suffered under the circumstances.

Advertisement

Abuse is still illegal, still horribly harmful, and it still matters. Safety at home cannot just be the project of a handful of under-funded nonprofits, it is a moral imperative that belongs to all of us.

Connie Phelps, Baltimore

Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement