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Baltimore can follow Denver's example

This "View from East Baltimore" suggests a cool, still skyline at dusk that contrasts with the bureaucratic mess a reader observes at City Hall.
This "View from East Baltimore" suggests a cool, still skyline at dusk that contrasts with the bureaucratic mess a reader observes at City Hall. (Chuck Robinson)

I recently saw the newscast about the mayor of Denver who initiated a program to streamline many city services (“Denver mayor talks traffic, Amazon’s HQ2 and speedy city service on ‘CBS This Morning,’” Nov. 13). It apparently has been successful using city employees instead of outside consultants and saved the city about $20 million.

It brought to mind a recent experience I had in Baltimore. I needed a permit to close off a few parking spaces for a moving truck. I called the city and was told how to get it done. When I arrived at Holliday Street, I was told my instructions were incorrect and I needed to go to another room in the building. When I reached the room I was told the person would need to speak with her supervisor as she knew nothing about the issue. Fifteen minutes later, I was told I was in the wrong building and needed to go to Redwood Street and waited another 15 minutes for the person to return with an address.

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I asked for a phone number to verify I was going to the correct person, which took another 15 minutes. I went into the hall to call and was told the office did not handle a request of this nature. At this point, I called my city councilman who arranged for the appropriate signage in minutes.

A rather mundane request took over one hour to accomplish. I hope our mayor is in touch with the mayor of Denver to deal with the inefficiency that costs time, money and is a black eye in dealing with the city of Baltimore.

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Bob Merbler, Baltimore

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