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Democratic debate was long on drama, short on content | READER COMMENTARY

Democratic presidential candidates former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, left, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) participate in the Democratic presidential primary debate at Paris Las Vegas on Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020, in Las Vegas.
Democratic presidential candidates former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, left, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) participate in the Democratic presidential primary debate at Paris Las Vegas on Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020, in Las Vegas.(Mario Tama / TNS)

Wednesday’s caterwauling Democrats’ debate was so much sound and fury signifying sound and fury, especially with Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden who seemed content with wallowing in attack mode (“Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders leads new Illinois presidential poll, but survey’s methodology raises questions about its accuracy," Feb. 20).

Since the first televised debates between John Kennedy and Richard Nixon in 1960, television has altered the debate structure. It’s no longer the content, it’s the style. During the second Kennedy/Nixon debate, “the gloves came off” as both candidates somehow were emotionally aroused by two islands separating Taiwan from China, Quemoy and Matsu.

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Today, we may no longer remember those arcane island blips but we do remember Mr. Nixon’s pallor, beard and that he had shifty eyes. Marshall McLuhan was right. The medium is the message.

Otts Laupus, Elkridge

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