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Proof that a mandatory AED can save a life | READER COMMENTARY

Loyola Blakefield players cheer and celebrate a recent 13-4 win over Gilman. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun).
Loyola Blakefield players cheer and celebrate a recent 13-4 win over Gilman. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun). (Ulysses Muñoz)

We read with interest your story on the successful life-saving efforts by Loyola Blakefield’s training staff as well as two doctors of freshman lacrosse defenseman Peter Laake (”Loyola Blakefield lacrosse player doing OK after on-field scare on Friday,” April 17). What made the save possible was the presence on site of an automated external defibrillator (AED) and what assured the presence of an AED on site was the Maryland law passed in 2006 mandating the presence of an AED at all scholastic sports events.

Thanks to your reporter for mentioning Louis Acompora, another freshman lacrosse goalie whose death in 2000 from the same cause, commotio cordis, spurred legislation across the country mandating AEDs at athletic events for this very reason. Because of such legislation, more positive outcomes from commotio cordis, such as the one described here, are possible.

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Henry Jampel, Towson, and Mary Newman, Wexford, Pennsylvania

The writers are, respectively, chair and president of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

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