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The hearing impaireds' world

Ivy Brach of Sykesville, who was born deaf and communicates with American Sign Language, has created a Facebook page called Sign Lively with Ivy where she posts ASL instructional videos, generally featuring one or two new words every day.

Being a hearing-impaired person myself, I read with great interest the commentary by Kim Flyr (“A man’s hearing problem renders others blind,” Feb. 13).

This is a "silent disability" and many times it is hard to navigate the world. One can feel like others think you are unfriendly, which has happened to a friend of mine when she wasn't hearing enough to participate in a conversation. When a sales persons tells me what I owe, I have to look at the cash register to see the amount. I can't read the dentist's lips when he has his mask on, so I tell him to just push my head whatever way he needs to. I also tell this to the person who trims my hair.

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We are starting a impaired hearing group here at Oak Crest and have been so surprised at the number of people who are interested. Actually, not surprised because we know there are many people suffering from the same disability and the frustration that comes with it.

Thank you for printing the commentary about something that really matters to a lot of people.

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Nancy Clayton Hoover, Parkville

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