xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Plan B for D.C. representation: Rejoin Maryland | READER COMMENTARY

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., right, accompanied by Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., left, speaks at a news conference on District of Columbia statehood on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, June 16, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., right, accompanied by Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., left, speaks at a news conference on District of Columbia statehood on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, June 16, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (Andrew Harnik/AP)

The citizens of Washington, D.C., obviously deserve representation in Congress, the representation enjoyed by their fellow citizens in the 50 states. But let’s face it: Republicans are never going to go for the creation of two new Senate seats that Democrats clearly would win (“House adopts bill to make the District of Columbia the 51st state; Senate GOP opposes,” June 26).

The alternative would be to merge the District back into Maryland from which it came. Maryland in 1791 donated the land that now comprises Washington, D.C. Establishing Washington as an independent city within Maryland — like Baltimore, the equivalent of a county — would ensure Washingtonians representation in Congress. They would vote with their fellow Marylanders for our two senators; the addition of their population to ours would likely qualify Maryland for a ninth House seat. Washington’s population is large enough that the new House district could be, essentially, the city of Washington, perhaps with a small section of either Montgomery or Prince George’s County.

Advertisement

Washington would retain autonomy on local issues. In fact, free of the meddling of Congress, it would have more. It would share in the state government infrastructure that Maryland has built up since 1788. It might not be the resolution to the representation issue that Washingtonians prefer, but it might be one they could get.

Dennis O’Shea, Baltimore

Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement